Concerned with Possibilities

“Scholars look for final truths they will never find. Creative writers concern themselves with possibilities that are always there to the receptive.” 
― Richard Hugo

One of my greatest joys as a writer is being in communion with other writers. I’m not able to teach as much as I once did and I long for the weekly Novel-in-Progress workshops I led; I gained at least as much as I gave by thinking critically and constructively about writing. I left each week intoxicated by the beauty and spirit of those writers’ words and their dedication to craft. 

I continue to offer the occasional one-off workshop, and I freelance as a developmental editor. During the hour-long drive home after a workshop a few weeks ago, my true calling as a facilitator came to me. I help writers find their stories.

So often writers arrive at a workshop, or send their manuscripts or query letters, certain they are writing about one thing. During the course of a weekend, or over the months we work together on a developmental edit, we so often discover together that their true story (so to speak) is something else entirely.

Petey: Garden Summer 2018

I ask, over and over, hoping it will become a mantra in the course of writing draft after draft, “What does your protagonist want?” For it is the protagonist’s internal goal that becomes the spine of the story.

The brilliant Lisa Cron, author of Wired for Story and Story Genius, talks about driving desire – the emotional agenda that steers your protagonist -which shapes how she views and responds to the world. That driving desire, and how your character moves through the story to satisfy it (i.e achieve the goal), is how you get under a reader’s skin, and hold their heart fast to page.

I think of my protagonist in my WIP, Kate, and her driving desire. Justice. She abandons the desire when it seems pointless and pretends that all she wants is to be numb, to move on with her life and forget the past, but her desire, the core of her, is too great to be denied. That driving desire is the story; the plot becomes all the obstacles in her way and how she overcomes them, or doesn’t.

As writers we are so often concerned with what’s happening, how we can move this scene forward into the next—the plot. We forget that the plot is the vehicle moving the story forward. But the driver behind the wheel is the protagonist’s internal desire.

Isn’t this how we move through life? The doing of it, the to-do lists, the goals and expectations, appointments and obligations that become the plot of our lives, when the real story is the why and who of those endless lists and obligations. 

If you are a writer, I challenge you to identify your characters’ desires and goals, how these change throughout the course of the narrative, and how each scene and plot point acts in service or awareness of the driving desires. 

I challenge us all as humans to step back from the plot of our lives to examine our stories for our own driving desires. 

“Only when we’re brave enough to explore the darkness will we discover the infinite power of our light.” Brene Brown

Of all the gin joints in all the towns…

Two years ago, I wrote a story based on someone who slipped in and out of my life in a matter of weeks, set in a place where my heart swelled, then shattered. The short story was published earlier this year and I was so pleased. But it’s an unfinished work. It is the foundation of an idea I’d considered developing into a novel, before I settled upon the tale I’m writing now. The characters knock around in my head, waiting. When the time is right I know they’ll still be there, ready to tell me what’s been happening since we last met.

 

Round about the same time my short story found its way to print, a slim and elegiac novel landed on bookshelves. It came to my attention over the summer and a few weeks ago I read it. I hadn’t heard of the author, but the novel had solid recommendations. The high praise is merited. It is an introspective, fragile story written in quiet but lyrical prose. It’s a book I’m glad to have read.

 

Except.

 

There is a French word which combines disappointment with a feeling of having been set up, somehow: déçu. I read this lovely novel and I said, “Je suis déçue.”

 

Of all the gin joints in all the towns in all the world, she walks into mine.

 

The similarities between the novel and my short story are striking. All the more so because the similarities are completely coincidental.

 

Which writer hasn’t heard the maxim, “There are only seven basic plots, but thousands of variations”? But I’m not just talking plot here. We each wrote a story with the same evocative setting, about a woman struggling in isolation who meets a vulnerable soul in need of rescue. The same kind of rescue, through the same means and bureaucracies and from the same sort of community. And in the distance stands another character, eager to help, if she’d only drop her defenses and let him in.

 

There’s a certain beautiful karma to the thought that perhaps we worked on our stories at the same time, that there are ideas, a place and themes big enough to carry us both in similar directions but which allow us to explore different emotions, interactions and outcomes.

 

But there’s a part of me that says,”Well, shit. Now what do I do?” Change the setting? No way, José. It’s as integral a part of the story as any of my characters. It is a character. And if I changed the story, well, that doesn’t work for obvious reasons. I feel deflated. Flattened.

 

Deçue.

 

And yet. The story I have written, the one that rattles around in my heart saying “Write more of me” is still mine to tell. As much as the other author owns the story that appears in the novel. Our stories may not be unique, but our voices are. I’ll admit, I’m relieved my short story was published before the novel appeared, so there can be no question that any similarities are coincidental should I ever take my plot and characters further. But I believe once I begin writing it again, something very different will emerge. I will, as Melissa Donovan advises (paraphrasing),“Forge ahead and believe in the story I want to tell.” 

 

Here are a couple of posts from great writers/writing coaches which help me keep perspective.

Melissa Donovan, Writing Forward: Are There Any Original Writing Ideas Left? (this is the post where I pulled the paraphrased quote above).

And because every writer keen on storycraft should read Chuck’s rockin’ blog

Chuck Wendig, Terrible Minds 25 Things Writers Should Stop Doing

 

And thanks to Casablanca for having the best quotes at the right time.

Gore Bay, Cheviot, New Zealand
Gore Bay, Cheviot, New Zealand

The Liebster Blog Award

A few weeks ago, a writer entered my life via this blog. Her writing journey, her goals, challenges and aspirations so closely mirror my own that I feel this solitary pursuit is neither as quixotic nor as lonely as it sometimes…very often…seems. Her name is Edith, she is a beautiful, inspiring writer and I encourage you to explore her exceptional blog In a Room of My Own

I am so proud to have been nominated for the Liebster Blog Award by Edith. The Liebster recognizes new bloggers “worth watching.” The sweet thing is, if you accept the nomination, you are an award winner. Ah, if only the writing life were as rewarding and as simple!

Edith wrote  “Julie Christine Johnson blogs about writing, books and her sources of inspiration at Chalk the Sun. Be sure to check her blog out and enjoy basking in the lyrical beauty of her search for the truly perfect sentence.”  So gracious, Edith- and so cool!!

Being a recipient of the award allows me the pleasure of nominating and awarding other blogs I think are worth watching.

 

I present you three blogs created by writers I learn from, am inspired by and whose work I think is worthy of many followers and great accolades:

Practice Makes Better  Dawn is a Seattle writer who chronicles her journey to an MFA program, her reading project and, very bravely, the heartbreak and hilarity of rejection on her smart blog.

DoGreat.net  Élan Karpinski’s blog is a forum for creativity, setting goals and practicing compassion. Her writing flows with positive energy and determination.

Civil War Writer Virginia Wood is writing a novel based on her ancestors’ experiences during the Civil War. Her blog is beautifully presented; I can’t wait to read the story she is crafting.

There are 5 rules attached to this award:

1. If you are nominated for the award and accept it, then you have won!

2. Link back to the person who presented the award to you.

3. Nominate 3-5 blogs with less than 200 followers who you feel deserve the award.

4. Let the nominees know by leaving a comment on their blog.

5. Attach the Liebster award badge to your site.

Thank you, Edith, for finding me in the cacophony of the blogosphere; your generous spirit compels me to reach out and support other writers. We all benefit from the conversation!