Getting the Words Right

Friday morning. Café. Rain. Quad shot Americano. It’s early afternoon in Chicago. Here on the island, I check my inbox like a lab rat presses the sugar water lever. This craving for the e-mail from my editor. The e-mail with her responses to my five weeks’ worth of edits on IN ANOTHER LIFE. The e-mail that signals the beginning of another five weeks of editing. Craving, yet dreading it, too.

 

I’m tired, feeling fragile. Sleep was elusive last night, although my restlessness allowed me to finish Tess of the d’Ubervilles and I surely could not have spared a moment’s thought for my characters while Tess was wandering forlorn and forsaken in pages yet unread. I’m debating the wisdom of opening that e-mail when it does come. Tomorrow morning, after a solid night’s rest and a peaceful hour of yoga, would be the smarter bet for my soul.

 

Maybe I shouldn’t look at my e-mail for the rest of the day.

 

The past two weeks of freedom from the manuscript have been devoted to tying up loose ends before I dive back into the Slough of Revision: assembling 2014 forms and receipts for the tax preparer (can you believe it, I found someone who works with writers!); preparing two writing residency applications; making dentist, optometrist, and doctor appointments that I’ve pushed down the to-do list to the next week or the one after that; emerging from my cocoon to see friends, send thank you notes, connect with family, bake bread, go the movies.

 

I’ve also been working on TUI, my third novel. I think longingly to a year ago, when THE CROWS OF BEARA poured out of me, unfettered by other obligations, free from competing distractions. The story flew from my fingertips with such certainty: 105,000 words in ten weeks.

 

What a different writing experience this time, in part because I had to set TUI aside for so long and I’m about to set it aside again. In part because the storytelling itself is different—deeper, more personal. There’s something I’m reaching for and I won’t get there in a first draft. I won’t know the layers I need to uncover until I see the whole of it spread out before me.

 

This is something new, this switching of writing gears from revision mode into first draft creativity, this distraction caused by the business of writing—all the thinking about websites and blog tours and blurbs and head shots and author platforms.

 

If I’m fortunate and THE CROWS OF BEARA sells, I will be in a cycle of writing-revising-promoting for the foreseeable future. What a gift that cycle will be in sustaining a viable career, but it’s something I will need to learn to manage: making the intellectual and emotional leap from one work to another, from one type of writing to another, scraping together the free moments—whether for a day or a few weeks—to clear my brain and allow new material to enter unabated.

 

It’s late afternoon in Chicago now. Cold and clear. Maybe my editor is watching the clock, hoping to be on her way home before dark to a quiet night in with her husband, or dinner out with girlfriends. Maybe she’s nearing the ending that I decided I wanted to change after I’d sent her my edits.

 

It’s not too late to make that change. But by April it will be. And I will be ready for too late. I will be ready to move on.

Interviewer: How much rewriting do you do?
Hemingway: It depends. I rewrote the ending of Farewell to Arms, the last page of it, 39 times before I was satisfied.
Interviewer: Was there some technical problem there? What was it that had stumped you?
Hemingway: Getting the words right.
— Ernest Hemingway, The Paris Review Interview, 1956

Reality Bites © Julie Christine Johnson 2015
Reality Bites © Julie Christine Johnson 2015

Behind the Curtain: A Novel’s Publication Schedule

March 2016. Mark your calendars. Okay, plan on marking your calendars. I haven’t gotten around to filling in important 2015 dates, much less thirteen months from now.

 

Well, there are a few I’ve inked in. A series of deadlines, a set of anticipated events, a dream that’s fast becoming a series of To-Dos, as REMEMBERING walks this path toward publication.

 

When I tell people that March 2016 is the publication date, most—unless they’ve gone through the process already—look at me with eyes wide and mouths agape. That long? they exclaim. Why the delay?

 

Oh, there’s no delay. In fact, REMEMBERING is a bit rushed. Most novels run on an eighteen-months-from-contract-signing-to-publication calendar. Mine’s about fifteen. And I’m grateful for each month, week, day between now and launch. Here’s a glimpse of what’s happening, what will happen, and what I need to make happen, in the time I have:

 

Approximate Manuscript Schedule:

First revision back to editor: January 26, 2015

Next edits to me: February 6, 2015

Final ms due: March 20, 2015

Cover for Author Review: probably Feb or March 2015

Copyedits for Author Review: April 13, 2015

Reading Group Guide & Author Q&A: April 27, 2015

ARCs** printed: Early June 2015

Synopsis for Sales: July 1, 2015

2nd pages for Author Review: Late September 2015

Blurbs due: Mid-October 2015

Final Closes to Printer: November 2015

**ARCs stands for Advance Reading Copies, which are sent to reviewers and other publicity/marketing contacts several months before the book is published. From these, cover and promotional blurbs are generated.

 

Last Thursday, five days ahead of deadline, I submitted my first round of edits. I stand back, a bit trembly and astonished at how many story changes I’ve made in these five weeks. Entire chapters eliminated; a character killed off; another just erased, as if he’d never existed; material I wrote a couple of years ago and then deleted—now revived, revised, restored. Names changed, plot points altered. And the revising is not over. A couple of weeks to breathe, to return to TUI, before I receive the next round from my editor. By sometime mid-April, when the copyedits are complete and I’ve submitted a Reading Group Guide and an Author Q&A (a little shiver of delight!), I’ll be released to think about other work.

 

Kinda sorta.

 

In late fall, I’ll begin working with my publisher’s publicist on planning the book’s “launch”—a publishing term I love: launch means the book’s release. I get this visual of a rocket lifting into the sky from a platform of flames, of confetti tossed from the window of a high rise, of a great bird spreading its wings and rising on a current of air. I love the idea of REMEMBERING launching into the world.

 

What I don’t love is the idea of a launch party. I’m an introvert. I hate parties. Do I have to have one? Who’s going to pay for it? What will I wear? What if no one comes? Would you bring your dog so I have someone to talk to? These are the things I worry about at 3 a.m.

 

But of course, that promotion work begins well before next fall. It’s work I must do, work my agent and I will map out together. It’s what I’m most dreading and most excited about. Self-promotion gives me the heebie-jeebies—it embarrasses me terribly—but it must be done. The learning curve will be steep, and my challenge is to find ways to make it thoughtful, compelling, inclusive, fun and sustainable. What excites me is the possibility of engaging with readers, but of course that won’t happen until I actually have some. Sigh. For the time being, I soak in and glean wisdom from writers in a couple of Facebook groups who are in the same stage of publication or a few steps ahead; arm myself with back issues of Poets and Writers, Midge Raymond’s excellent Everyday Book Marketing, and Dan Blank‘s weekly newsletter, and scribble out must-dos and wish-lists, budgets and bios.

 

I remind myself what a gift I’ve been given—this hand on my shoulder that says, “We believe enough in this book that we’re taking it out into the world.” This opportunity to realize a dream.

 

I don’t have to have a launch party. But if I do, you’re all invited!

You write because you need to write, or because you hope someone will listen or because writing will mend something broken inside you or bring something back to life.” ― Joanne Harris, Blackberry Wine

One month, four drafts, 1300 pages: First Round Edits
Five weeks, four drafts, 1300 pages: First Round Edits